A World without AIDS

Thirty-six million people have died of AIDS since 1981, and about as many are living with HIV today. But antiretroviral drugs can suppress HIV blood levels almost completely, making the virus virtually impossible to transmit. That’s the UNAIDS 90-90-90 target for 2020, achieved when 90 percent of all people living with HIV know their status, receive sustained treatment and achieve viral suppression. The end of AIDS is in sight, but it won’t happen without stronger health systems, intensive outreach to marginalized populations, trade agreements that ensure affordable treatments, and adequate resources. Will the world make those commitments?

Festival: Aspen Ideas 2017

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