The Epidemic of Loneliness

A crisis is emerging that seems likely to pose as grave a threat to public health as obesity or substance abuse: social isolation. Neuroscientists have identified regions of the brain that respond to loneliness, and a powerful body of research shows that lonely people are more likely to become ill, experience cognitive decline, and die early. Across the industrialized world, millions of people live with sparse human contact, putting their well-being at risk as they put new pressures on health and social service systems. Does social media drive loneliness, or help to cure it? How does loneliness alter the brain, and how can we treat this condition? You can listen to this discussion via our podcast Aspen Ideas to Go. Listen here on Apple Podcasts: http://apple.co/2ANOgbs

Festival: Spotlight Health 2017

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