Aspen Ideas to Go Podcast

Despite medical advances and the application of scientific principles to modern medicine, there seems to be increasing controversy about the "right" diagnostic and treatment choices, even for very common medical issues – such as how best to treat high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol; whether to take vitamins, and who should be screened for cancer with mammograms and PSA. Doctors Jerome Groopman, chair of Harvard Medical School, and Pamela Hartzband, assistant professor at Harvard Medical School, discuss why experts disagree, why there isn't a clear "right" answer, and what patients need to know to make decisions in the face of conflicting information.
Sunday, May 3, 2015 - 21:00
Description Some people seem to lead inner lives that are richer and more substantive than the rest of us. How do they do it? In this talk, author and commentator David Brooks explores some of history's leaders in terms of personal character. He asks how love, suffering, struggle, surrender and obedience lead them to their depth. His latest book, "The Road to Character" was released on April 14, 2015. This talk, recorded last summer at the Aspen Ideas Festival, serves as a preview to many of the themes Brooks explores in the book.
Sunday, April 26, 2015 - 21:00
In this lecture, philosopher, cultural theorist, and author Kwame Anthony Appiah rejects the idea that cross-cultural conversations often lead to the discovery of irreconcilable differences. The argument holds that conversations across groups about ethical questions breakdown because each culture has different and incompatible ethical starting points. Appiah maintains such an argument is mistaken. Because he says, many people have found cross-cultural encounters to be among the most rewarding experiences in their lives and without them, we have little chance of solving the global problems that we face.
Sunday, April 19, 2015 - 21:00
A professor of public policy at Harvard, Robert D. Putnam has consulted for the last three American presidents and many other leaders around the globe. His newest book, "Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis" is a groundbreaking examination of the growing inequality gap and explores why fewer Americans today have the opportunity for upward mobility. He has written fourteen books and been translated into more than twenty languages. His books "Bowling Alone" and "Making Democracy Work", are among the most cited publications in the social sciences in the last half century. This conversation between Putnam and Walter Isaacson, president and CEO of the Aspen Institute, was recorded live at the Institute's Alma and Joseph Gildenhorn Book Series.
Sunday, April 12, 2015 - 21:00
At 28, musician Jon Batiste is considered by many to be one of the most exciting and progressive new crossover talents on the scene today. His modern take on the American songbook — equally influenced by his passion for jazz and classical styles, which he calls "Social Music"  — attracts critical acclaim as well as audiences across all demographics. These two New Orleans natives will discuss Batiste's music, their hometown, the importance of music education, and the state and future of American musical traditions more broadly. Batiste demonstrates much of the music they discuss on his melodica.
Sunday, April 5, 2015 - 21:00

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