Health and US Politics

White working-class voters without a college education are most vulnerable to diseases of despair — suicide, drug overdoses, and alcohol-related liver disease — and they are also most likely to have voted for President Trump. This population is deeply concerned about rising health care costs, according to focus groups conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation, and more likely to lose their health insurance if the Affordable Care Act is repealed. One thing both political parties keep learning is that no matter how dissatisfied the American public is with the health care system, doing anything about it is risky business. What do we know about the connections between health and politics, and why do they matter?

Festival: Spotlight Health 2017

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