Video and Audio

Select video and audio from Spotlight Health and the Aspen Ideas Festival. All video and audio is from 2017.

SEARCH

Spend an hour with two of America’s best teachers, exploring the ups and downs of their experiences on the front lines of American education. What brought them to the classroom—and why did they stay? What do they wish parents and policymakers understood better about the life of a teacher? What’s changed the most about their jobs in the last few years? How do they focus on students' social and emotional development needs?

Featuring:
Nate Bowling, Leticia Ingram, Ross Wiener

Work, play, privacy, communication, finance, war, and dating: algorithms and the machines that run them have upended them all. Will artificial intelligence become as ubiquitous as electricity? Is there any industry AI won't touch? Will AI tend to steal jobs and exacerbate income inequalities, or create new jobs and amplify human abilities at work -- or, both? How can the global population adjust to the changes ushered in by artificial intelligence and its capabilities?

Featuring:
Andrew Ng, Jason Pontin

Just because robots can do jobs that humans otherwise do, does that mean that they should? This question becomes especially difficult when we task a robot with applying lethal force. At an alarming rate, militaries from around the globe are employing AI to optimize operations and build weapons systems (i.e. robots) to take on more and more roles and tasks previously undertaken by human warfighters. But we should first ask: What does it mean to give a robot the power and authority to kill?

Featuring:
Heather Roff, Alexis Madrigal, David Rothkopf

A cure for type 1 diabetes within six years? It is an audacious goal, but that’s the commitment made by City of Hope, a designated comprehensive care center with a long history of groundbreaking work in diabetes (including the development of synthetic insulin). Fueled by a $50 million funding program led by the Wanek family, City of Hope is embarking on research that will investigate novel immunotherapy approaches and study methods of boosting and replacing insulin-secreting beta cells.

Featuring:
Bart Roep, Margery Perry, Phyllis Heydt

Are we a union, or are we 50 states? States are finding themselves at odds with federal policy on a wide range of issues: immigration enforcement, marijuana legalization, environmental regulation, health issues including reproductive services and Medicaid, and social issues from gay marriage to who can use what bathroom. What are the constitutional roots of these conflicts? Why are they arising so frequently today?

Featuring:
Heather Gerken, Elliot Gerson, Josh Shapiro

A wide-ranging discussion of administration priorities for roads, bridges, and other complexities that challenge the nation’s infrastructure.

Featuring:
Elaine L. Chao, Joanne Lipman

What can a French modernist composer and a sitar-playing Indian rock-star teach us about the science of happiness? What connects a bombastic 19th-century symphony to 2016 research about the psychology of making decisions? This groundbreaking talk from Arthur Brooks, a former professional French hornist turned PhD economist and president of the American Enterprise Institute, offers a tour through timeless compositions from J. S.

Featuring:
Arthur Brooks

Recent scientific evidence has confirmed significant links between lifestyle habits and cognitive health, but the many reports are often confusing, and sometimes contradictory. What does the new research reveal, and where do knowledge gaps remain? Can we translate what we are learning into practical strategies for improving memory performance and optimizing brain health?

Featuring:
Gary Small

Tens of thousands of men and women have left comfortable, privileged lives to join the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria—and kill for it. The highest-ranking American currently fighting for ISIS is John Georgelas, a Texan whose dad was a US Air Force colonel. Who are the Westerners who join ISIS? Where do they come from? What do they believe? And most importantly, what can we do to stop them?

Featuring:
Graeme Wood, James Fallows

Individual genetic makeup and the genetic signature of diseases vary tremendously, but the goal of matching them with custom-tailored treatment remains in its infancy. Precision medicine, which uses the powerful tools of molecular biology, genomics, and bioinformatics, promises great advances. Much of the early focus of the field is on cancer, where researchers are studying tumor heterogeneity, therapeutic responses, and the patient characteristics that influence their interactions.

Featuring:
Victor Dzau, Elaine Mardis, John Torres, Mikael Dolsten

Beneath the tumble of day-to-day politics — the anger and crude attacks, the polarization and zero-sum thinking — vital democratic legacies are being squandered. To rebuild the moral and intellectual infrastructure of democracy, we need to reclaim the good name of essential public virtues such as moderation, civility, and compromise — once widely admired and praised, now often dismissed as weakness or even betrayal.

Featuring:
David Brooks, Peter Wehner, Michael Gerson, Amy Walter

Medical errors in hospitals rank as the third leading cause of death in the United States, exceeded only by cancer and heart attacks, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University. At least 200,000 preventable deaths occur annually in these institutions of healing, although some researchers say the true number may be double that. Hospital-acquired infections, diagnostic errors, and medication mix-ups are among the leading culprits.

Featuring:
Peter J. Pronovost, Carolyn Clancy, Julie Rovner

Most of us face the desire to be creative within busy, scheduled lives. Therefore, creativity involves carving out and holding space in the midst of complex personal and professional demands and very real performance goals. This workshop frames creativity as a process of “art thinking.” If you are engaged in art as a process in any part of life, you are not going from a known point A to a known point B but inventing point B.

Featuring:
Amy Whitaker

America has always meant business. We’re a nation of self-starters, strivers, and entrepreneurs — with the courage to take big risks and the confidence to determine our own destiny. Entrepreneurs are seen as the beating heart of our economy, generating the jobs, wealth, and innovation that keep the American Dream alive. But what are the conditions that small businesses need now to succeed? What kinds of talents must entrepreneurs possess to forward their businesses?

Featuring:
Mark Hoffman, Kevin O'Leary

Wonder what you ever did before Hamilton came along? So do we! Join us for a lively and informal behind-the-scenes look at all things "A.Ham" with the show’s producer and the host of the Hamilton fan podcast The Room Where It’s Happening. We’ll explore how it came to be, what the creation process was like, challenges the producers faced, and whether the team that made it happen is surprised by its impact on our culture.

Featuring:
Travon Free, Jeffrey Seller

We need an unprecedented nature of innovation if we are to address the challenges of our time. Traditional innovation methodologies such as human-centered design are excellent for designing products and services, but how do we address complex, scaled, and critical challenges that are systemic in nature? Professor Banny Banerjee will speak about the mindsets, processes, and skill sets that comprise systems leadership—the type of leadership that is urgently needed at all levels.

Featuring:
Banny Banerjee

Social entrepreneurs Anne Kelly of Ceres and Rebecca Onie of Health Leads discuss how they’ve made unlikely allies in unlikely places, despite working on hot-button issues in a difficult political climate. By meeting people, practitioners, policymakers, and leaders where they are, Ceres and Health Leads have made considerable progress on two of the most urgent and universal issues of our time: climate and clean energy, and making meeting social needs a standard practice of health care.

Featuring:
Rebecca Onie, Anne Kelly, Kevin Delaney

Three of the nation’s most prestigious institutions of higher learning are now led by women with broad accomplishments in health-related fields. Elizabeth Bradley, Vassar College’s newly appointed president, has helped to strengthen health systems around the world; Paula Johnson, president of Wellesley College, has special expertise in women’s health and gender biology; Kathleen McCartney, president of Smith College, is an authority on child development and developmental psychology.

Featuring:
Elizabeth Bradley, Paula Johnson, Kathleen McCartney, Jackie Judd

While the act of spacing out has long been attributed to fueling creativity, many of us are downright uncomfortable with being bored. In fact, a prominent social science study reveals that a surprising number of people would rather be electrically shocked than left alone with their thoughts. Add a constant stream of updates, texts, and other technological distractions to an already tense relationship, and it can feel like we’re doomed.

Featuring:
Manoush Zomorodi, Timothy Wilson, Sherry Turkle

Mental health disorders are rampant in America’s correctional facilities — in many cases, our prisons and jails are the main providers of mental health treatment in their municipalities. Furthermore, prisons and jails routinely subject people with mental illness to environments that radically exacerbate their condition, often to the point of suicide or self-harm. Why do so many mentally ill people end up behind bars, and what are the consequences for those inmates?

Featuring:
Thomas Dart, Glenn Martin, Gillian White

Pages