The Power of Play
We know that sports and exercise are essential for still-developing bodies and minds, building not only muscle power and better coordination, but confidence, focus, creativity and teamwork. But we also know that youth aren't getting the physical activity they need — school gym classes and recess have been cut in the US, technology is pulling people inside, and poverty and terror are curtailing active living around the world. What impact will all that have on the leadership capacity of the next generation? What will it mean for productivity, the capacity to learn, and global health?
Festival: 2014

Watch and Listen: Society

Many patients have said, "Having a heart attack was the best thing that ever happened to me," or "Being diagnosed with... See more
George Washington School of Public Health dean Ruth Katz talks with preventive medicine guru Dean Ornish, MD, and... See more
NPR political analyst Cokie Roberts talks with some of the nation's most accomplished women about how they got where... See more
Throughout his career, eminent biologist E.O. Wilson has worked to bridge contributions to population genetics,... See more
Many patients have said, "Having a heart attack was the best thing that ever happened to me," or "Being diagnosed with... See more
The head of Shambhala (a global network of over 200 meditation and retreat centers) inspires participants by sharing... See more

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