Health and US Politics

White working-class voters without a college education are most vulnerable to diseases of despair — suicide, drug overdoses, and alcohol-related liver disease — and they are also most likely to have voted for President Trump. This population is deeply concerned about rising health care costs, according to focus groups conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation, and more likely to lose their health insurance if the Affordable Care Act is repealed. One thing both political parties keep learning is that no matter how dissatisfied the American public is with the health care system, doing anything about it is risky business. What do we know about the connections between health and politics, and why do they matter?

Festival: Spotlight Health 2017

More on this Session

Watch and Listen: Politics

Why read? National Endowment for the Arts Chairman Dana Gioia explores the enormous social, political, and economic... See more
Ashraf Ghani, former Finance Minister of Afghanistan, and Hamed Wardak, founder of a nonaligned political movement with... See more
The success of MoveOn.org injected the power of the Internet into American politics and elections permanently.... See more
With almost half the planet using mobile phones today, the device has transformed into a mega platform, changing how,... See more
Green politics, also known as the "Green Movement," is a political ideology that places a high importance on ecology,... See more
The character of a city is born out of its history, culture, geographic location, climate, economics, political... See more

Pages