Does Women's Viagra Turn You On?

Seventeen years after Viagra was approved to treat erectile dysfunction in men, woman may soon be able to take a drug to boost their sexual desire. In early June, an FDA Advisory Committee recommended the approval of Flibanserin, which had twice before been rejected by the FDA on the basis of its modest benefit and possible side effects. It’s not yet clear whether approval now will be an important stride for sexual equality, a long-awaited answer to an unmet need, risky medicine, a windfall for the pharmaceutical industry – or all of the above. What’s the science behind the new pink pill? How big is the demand and what is the potential downside? Why do women’s health advocates disagree about the drug’s value?

Festival: Spotlight Health 2015

Watch and Listen: Health

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