Does Women's Viagra Turn You On?

Seventeen years after Viagra was approved to treat erectile dysfunction in men, woman may soon be able to take a drug to boost their sexual desire. In early June, an FDA Advisory Committee recommended the approval of Flibanserin, which had twice before been rejected by the FDA on the basis of its modest benefit and possible side effects. It’s not yet clear whether approval now will be an important stride for sexual equality, a long-awaited answer to an unmet need, risky medicine, a windfall for the pharmaceutical industry – or all of the above. What’s the science behind the new pink pill? How big is the demand and what is the potential downside? Why do women’s health advocates disagree about the drug’s value?

Festival: 2015

Watch and Listen: Health

Breakthrough research has revealed that the brain is especially open to change during specific periods in life –... See more
The Second City and Caring Across Generations have joined forces to develop a unique training program that strengthens... See more
Medical errors in hospitals rank as the third leading cause of death in the United States, exceeded only by cancer and... See more
Invalid health news comes in many flavors. Some is utterly fake and potentially dangerous: asserting links between... See more
US Senator Mitch McConnell has just announced that he will bring health reform legislation to the Senate floor for a... See more
Dip into a groundbreaking medical memoir by Kurt Newman, president and CEO of Children’s National Medical Center and... See more

Pages