A Decade After Katrina

Before Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast, almost one-quarter of New Orleans residents lived below the poverty line, 20 percent lacked health insurance, and rates of infant mortality and chronic disease were among the highest in the US. Charity Hospital, one of the oldest public hospitals in the nation, provided more than 80 percent of all uncompensated care in the area. The decision to close the iconic hospital following the storm tore a huge hole through the city’s safety net. A decade later, do residents of New Orleans have access to appropriate medical care? What has been done to rebuild the health system?

Festival: Spotlight Health 2015

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