Aspen Ideas to Go Podcast

Across the US, students are heading back to college for the start of the school year. Many will wrestle with mental health challenges. Campus counseling offices are busier than ever and peer-run mental health clubs are popping up. Colleges are working to keep up as students’ academic, social, and athletic demands sometimes become too much to bear. In this episode, Teen Vogue editor Samhita Mukhopadhyay leads a conversation with Paula Johnson, president of Wellesley College, and Dan Porterfield, now president of the Aspen Institute and former head of Franklin & Marshall College.
Tuesday, August 14, 2018 - 20:00

Midterms are often seen as the first nationwide referendum on a first-term president. Donald Trump’s ratings have ranged from low to medium-low, but a “blue wave” of victories is far from guaranteed this fall. Where Democrats strive for inclusiveness with regard to race, gender, and immigration status, critics see “identity politics,” and successfully fending off that critique may determine the party’s fate across the country. Who are the rising Democratic stars to watch, and what internal clashes must the Democrats resolve as they look toward 2020? This episode features Amy Walter, national editor of The Cook Political Report; Reihan Salam, executive editor of National Review; Jamelle Bouie, chief political correspondent for Slate; Mike Allen, chief White House correspondent for Politico; and Celinda Lake, pollster and political strategist for progressives.

Friday, August 10, 2018 - 17:30

In our first “Off Stage” bonus episode, New York Times Contributing Op-Ed Writer Wajahat Ali speaks with former white supremacist skinhead Christian Picciolini. For 8 years, Picciolini was a follower, then a leader in the white supremacist movement. When the people he thought he hated showed compassion, he left the group. Now he helps others disengage from extremism. In this one-on-one discussion, he talks about what draws someone to join an extremist group, why white supremacy is growing in the United States, and how we can stop hate in its tracks. Ali and Picciolini were speakers at the Aspen Ideas Festival in June.

Friday, August 10, 2018 - 10:15

At age 25, Gaby Pacheco was the first undocumented Latina to testify in front of Congress. In this conversation with New York Times Contributing Op-Ed Writer Wajahat Ali, she talks about the struggles immigrants still face years later. She spearheaded efforts that led to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and participated in the Trail of Dreams, a four-month walk from Miami to Washington, DC, calling attention to the plight of immigrants. In this one-on-one conversation, she speaks with Ali about her frustrations with the Trump administration, the challenges facing immigrants who want to become citizens, and the crisis at the US-Mexico border. Pacheco and Ali were speakers at the Aspen Ideas Festival in June.

Friday, August 10, 2018 - 10:15
One year after a deadly hate rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, the city continues to heal. White supremacists gathered at the University of Virginia and then in downtown Charlottesville in mid-August last year. Protesters clashed and a young woman, Heather Heyer, died in the fray. Now, the historic city that was once home to Thomas Jefferson and James Monroe is also associated with the white supremacist hate rallies. Why did these groups choose Charlottesville? What has Charlottesville learned, and what can it teach America about healing and resilience in a time of re-surging hate and divisiveness? Slate Chief Political Correspondent Jamelle Bouie leads a conversation with former Charlottesville Mayor Michael Signer, domestic policy advisor for President Obama Melody Barnes, and Leslie Greene Bowman, president of the Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello.
Tuesday, August 7, 2018 - 17:15

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