Aspen Ideas to Go Podcast

For 60 years, the US government has been laying secret doomsday plans to save itself in the event of nuclear war — even while the rest of us die. Today, a third generation of doomsday planners are settling into life inside a network of bunkers that are staffed 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, ready to house top government officials in the event of catastrophe. How did these Cold War-era plans come together, how have they evolved over time, and how prepared are we for a worst-case scenario? Featuring Garrett Graff, author of Raven Rock and executive director of the Aspen Institute’s Cybersecurity and Technology Program, and Peter Feaver, professor of political science and public policy at Duke University.

Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - 16:00

America has always meant business. We’re a nation of self-starters, strivers, and entrepreneurs — with the courage to take big risks and the confidence to determine our own destiny. But, are courage and confidence alone enough for success? Kevin O’Leary, star of ABC’s Shark Tank and chairman of O’Shares Investments, explains what makes a good entrepreneur. How important are start-up’s to the American economy? And, are government, regulations, and taxes impeding the start and growth of companies? O’Leary speaks with Mark Hoffman, broadcast veteran and chairman of CNBC.

Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 15:00

Is the internet loosening our collective grasp on the truth? Pioneers of digital news once argued that new online sources would bring us new perspectives about the world. They did not anticipate the internet would destroy traditional media gatekeepers and give everyone a chance to indulge in news that confirms their preexisting ideas. How does the mass media fit into this landscape? Does the role of newspaper publisher or local TV station owner now belong to Facebook and Google? How do we sort fact from fiction? Featuring Joshua Johnson, Susan Page, Campbell Brown, and David Leonhardt.

Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 15:30

A crisis is emerging that could pose as grave a threat to public health as obesity or substance abuse: social isolation. Neuroscientists have identified regions of the brain that respond to loneliness, and a powerful body of research shows that lonely people are more likely to become ill, experience cognitive decline, and die early. Across the industrialized world, millions of people live with sparse human contact, putting their well-being at risk. Does social media drive loneliness, or help to cure it? How does loneliness alter the brain, and how can we treat this condition? This conversation is from Spotlight Health and the featured guests are Carla Perissinotto, Dixon Chibanda, Julianne Holt-Lunstad, and Katie Hafner.

Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 10:30

Muslim Americans — especially those who work in government or in other ways to counter radicalism and terrorism — feel caught in the middle. Much of American society questions their patriotism, while their own communities question their loyalty. The Department of Homeland Security’s Haris Tarin joins Rabia Chaudry, author, attorney, and activist, for a discussion about being Muslim and American in 2017.

Tuesday, November 7, 2017 - 16:45

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