Aspen Ideas to Go Podcast

Hours before President Trump attends a NATO Summit in Brussels, we examine the role of the alliance and how it fits into Europe’s recent struggles. Brexit, terrorism, a new anti-establishment government in Italy, and rising nationalism fueled in part by a flood of immigrants from the Syrian war are testing the grand European experiment. How should the continent move forward? And how will the region handle Trump’s anti-European and anti-NATO rhetoric? The Aspen Institute’s Elliot Gerson leads a conversation with Kati Marton, journalist and human rights advocate; Douglas Lute, former US ambassador to NATO; and Mircea Dan Geoana, former president of the Romanian Senate and founder of Aspen Romania.

Tuesday, July 10, 2018 - 19:45

Former FBI Director James Comey says transparency and a desire to maintain his agency’s credibility prompted him to reopen the Hillary Clinton email investigation in 2016. He sent a letter to Congress days before the presidential election saying he had new evidence in the case. To this day, some people blame him for Clinton’s defeat. In this episode, he speaks with journalist Katie Couric about the details surrounding the decision. He also talks about his book, A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership, and what’s next for him in life and career. Their conversation was held June 30, 2018 at the Aspen Ideas Festival.

Tuesday, July 3, 2018 - 16:30

As the nation’s top doctor, US Surgeon General Jerome Adams has pledged to lead with science and collaborate with local entities to tackle national health crises. In this episode, he speaks with NPR’s Alison Kodjak about children being separated from their parents at the southern US border, the opioid crisis, gun violence, and mental health. Adams is the 20th person to serve as Surgeon General. In the position, he promotes wellness strategies, warns the public against emerging health hazards, and is a leader of the 6,500-person Public Health Service Commissioned Corps.

Wednesday, June 27, 2018 - 09:00

What makes two people click? What does it really mean to say, “we have chemistry”? The Atlantic's Olga Khazan talks to biological anthropologist Helen Fisher about the four styles of thought and behavior that Fisher has identified through brain scans that help explain the biological underpinnings of romantic love, love addiction, adultery, and divorce. Based on data collected from 35,000 single Americans, Fisher explains modern courtship, why a trend she calls “slow love” makes her optimistic about relationships in the digital age, and how to use brain chemistry to keep love alive.

Thursday, June 21, 2018 - 17:45

In a recent Alabama Senate election, 96 percent of African American voters supported one candidate, and according to a Pew Research Center survey, 66 percent of Latino voters chose just one candidate during the most recent Presidential election. Do Democrats take the "people of color" vote for granted? How can Republicans appeal more to people of color? What are the ways in which people are viewing voting through the lens of race? How is voting being encouraged, or suppressed? This panel discussion includes Juan Williams, Irene Bueno, David Brooks, and Kamilah Prince

Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 10:30

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