AIF Blog - Science

August 22, 2017
 Walter Isaacson speaks with Berkeley biologist Jennifer Doudna at the Aspen Ideas Festival in June 2017. CRISPR is the cheapest, simplest, and most effective way of manipulating DNA. It has the power to give us the cure to HIV, genetic diseases, and some cancers. It could even help address the world’s hunger crisis. But, it may result in unforeseen consequences. The technology could lead to...
August 11, 2017
Jackie Judd, Yasmin Hurd, Nora Volkow, Vivek Murthy, and Perri Peltz speak onstage at Spotlight Health, the opening segment of the Aspen Ideas Festival.It’s been called the most perilous drug crisis ever and it was generated in the healthcare system. The epicenter of the opioid crisis is the United States, where overdose deaths have quadrupled since 1999. President Trump has pledged to step up law enforcement...
June 25, 2017
Carl Zimmer writes books, articles, essays, and blog posts in which he reports from the frontiers of biology, where scientists are expanding our understanding of life. Since 2013 he has been a columnist at the New York Times, where his column “Matter” appears each week. He agreed to answer some of our questions before taking the stage at Aspen Ideas Festival to discuss genetics and the future of babymaking.What is...
June 22, 2017
Jenara Nerenberg is a writer covering the innovations in the sciences and humanities that help carry humanity forward. Her work can be found online at Fast Company, New York Magazine, Susan Cain’s QuietRev, CNN, TIME, Travel & Leisure, NextBillion, BlackBook and the Greater Good Science Center. She is scheduled to speak at Spotlight Health on how social capital affects wellbeing. She agreed to answer our...
June 16, 2017
Aspen New Voices Fellows pose at the Aspen Ideas Festival in 2016.The challenges of international development can seem insurmountable. The world’s toughest problems in global health, food security, and poverty reduction defy easy solutions. The Aspen New Voices Fellowship, part of Aspen Global Health and Development, is working to address these problems. This year, the program's Fellows will lend their voices to the...
June 07, 2017
Former Vice President Al Gore stars in the riveting and rousing follow-up to An Inconvenient Truth, Truth to Power. It's part of our flim lineup for the Aspen Ideas Festival.Public tickets for flims go on sale June 16.  SPOTLIGHT HEALTH LINEUP James Beard: America's First Foodie (June 23) Today's American food movement can be traced back to one man: cookbook author, journalist, television celebrity, and teacher...
May 16, 2017
Dr. Elisabeth Rosenthal speaks with Joanne Kenen, executive editor of health care for Politico. Their conversation was part of the Alma and Joseph Gildenhorn Book Series at the Aspen Institute.Elisabeth Rosenthal writes about our broken healthcare system in her new book, An American Sickness: How Healthcare became Big Business and How You Can Take it Back. She says the system, comprised of hospitals, doctors,...
May 11, 2017
 Christina Agapakis is Creative Director at Ginkgo Bioworks, a biological design company growing cultured products for partners across many industries. Agapakis also writes about biology, technology, and culture for numerous outlets. She will speak as part of The Genetics Revolution track at Aspen Ideas. What’s synthetic biology, and how is the company you work for, Ginkgo Bioworks, using it to create consumer...
April 25, 2017
Science Friday host Ira Flatow and Janna Levin, author of Black Hole Blues, on stage at the Aspen Ideas Festival.Why do human beings explore? And, why are the most adventurous explorers drawn to outer space? Naturalist and astronomer David Aguilar explains why the drive for adventure fades after childhood, and how we can regain it as adults. Also, a group of physicists dig into what the universe is made of. Janna...
April 20, 2017
  Elizabeth Lesser is co-founder of Omega Institute, and the author of three books. She will speak as part of the Caregiving track at Spotlight Health. (Photo: "Nurse Maggie," credit: Elizabeth Lesser) My younger sister Maggie was a renaissance woman—a no-nonsense nurse practitioner in a rural Vermont community, an accomplished artist, a mother and farmer and beekeeper and maple syrup producer. And she also was my...

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