Full Schedule

Jump To:   Wednesday 6/26  |  Thursday 6/27  |  Friday 6/28  |  Saturday 6/29  |  Sunday 6/30  |  Monday 7/1  |  Tuesday 7/2  |  All

Planetarium Show   Space and the Cosmos
Interactive Tours of the Observable Universe
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm MDT on Wednesday, June 26, 2013
(PLANETARIUM SHOW-Tickets Required) Take an interactive tour through a three-dimensional atlas of the known universe. We will voyage from the solar system to interstellar space, past nearby galaxies and distant galaxy clusters, and out to the edge of the Big Bang itself. Learn about our home and our place in the cosmos.
Ka Chun Yu
Buckminster Fuller Dome, Planetarium
Evening Session   Space and the Cosmos
Other Earths and the Origins of Life
8:30 pm - 9:30 pm MDT on Wednesday, June 26, 2013
(Tickets Required) New evidence of exoplanets reveals larger than expected occurrences of potentially habitable worlds in our galactic neighborhood. What does this tell us about life on other planets? How will we search for signs of life beyond the solar system?
Dimitar Sasselov
Hotel Jerome Ballroom
Plenary Session   Space and the Cosmos
What Is Mars Teaching Us? Notes from the Robotic Exploration of the Red Planet
9:00 am - 10:00 am MDT on Thursday, June 27, 2013
Steady NASA funding for robotic Mars missions has resulted in the uninterrupted presence of human spacecraft at the Red Planet since 1997. At this point, a fleet of four US and one European robotic explorers is active on and around Mars. The most recent arrival was the exciting Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover mission, which landed on the Red Planet in August 2012. This session highlights some of the key development and operational challenges of the recent US rover missions, gives a taste of the most exciting science results, and closes with important points from this decades-long effort applicable to both space- and Earth-based endeavors.
Daniel Limonadi
Paepcke Auditorium
Tutorial Session   Space and the Cosmos
Expanding Our Horizons: Matter, Space, and the Universe
10:20 am - 11:20 am MDT on Thursday, June 27, 2013
This session will explore the almost unfathomable scales of theoretical physics, from the mysterious properties of dark matter to the depths of our universe and beyond. Experiments, like the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva that smashes together protons at high energies, tell us about the smallest length scales we can observe today while measurements of the universe stretch our observations of large length scales to their limits. Theoretical physicists like Lisa Randall tie the results of these experiments to mysteries about our universe. Professor Randall will tell us about the Higgs boson discovery and its implications. She will also explore possibilities for the nature of dark matter and of space itself. Can there be an unseen extra dimension in our universe? Theoretical physics truly knows no bounds.
Lisa Randall
Doerr-Hosier Center, Kaufman Room
Explorations   Space and the Cosmos
Solar Scope Viewing Party
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm MDT on Thursday, June 27, 2013
Join members of the local Three Rivers Astronomy Club for this unique opportunity to observe our nearest star, the Sun. Through specially-equipped solar telescopes, you’ll view sun spots, as well as exciting solar flares, prominences, and filaments that project from the surface of the Sun.
Anderson Park
Speaker Salon   Space and the Cosmos
Uncharted Territory: From Deep Oceans to Deep Space
5:30 pm - 6:30 pm MDT on Thursday, June 27, 2013
(Tickets required) Thanks to powerful new technologies––and the good old inborn drive to explore––human beings are now investigating places once assumed to be inaccessible. We hear from an oceanographer pushing the limits of technology to explore bizarre “lakes” in the deepest recesses of our oceans; a planetary geologist using images from orbiting spacecraft to explore processes shaping the surfaces of planets, such as dunes migrating across the surface of Mars; and an astrophysicist trying to solve the mystery of the solar wind by building a probe that will fly right into the blazing atmosphere of our sun.
David Gallo Maria Banks Justin Kasper Paula Apsell
Hotel Jerome Ballroom
Planetarium Show   Space and the Cosmos
Liquid Gold: Are We Taking Water for Granted?
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm MDT on Thursday, June 27, 2013
(PLANETARIUM SHOW-Tickets Required) We live on the water planet. But consider the global distribution of clean, fresh water. Where is it and where is it not? Our seven billion cohorts are distributed in patterns that closely follow drinkable water. Projections for aridification suggest that changes are coming; indeed, they are already happening. People are moving, land-use patterns are changing, and lifestyles are being impacted. A global perspective allows one to see that strategies for adapting to change – even flourishing amidst change -can be identified and promulgated. Come be part of the change.
Bob Raynolds
Buckminster Fuller Dome, Planetarium
Special Event   Space and the Cosmos
Special Event: Icarus at the Edge of Time
7:30 pm - 9:15 pm MDT on Thursday, June 27, 2013
(Tickets must be purchased) Icarus at the Edge of Time is a mesmerizing tale set in outer space about a boy who challenges the awesome might of a black hole. Based on the children’s book by physicist Brian Greene, this futuristic re-imagining of the classic myth takes audiences of all ages on a whirlwind voyage through space and time to the very edge of understanding. Featuring an original score by Philip Glass, script adapted by Brian Greene and David Henry Hwang, and film created and directed by Al + Al, Icarus at the Edge of Time will be performed by the Aspen Philharmonic Orchestra. Brian Greene will open the show by introducing the science of general relativity and black holes, and the possibility of time travel that they offer. Icarus at the Edge of Time premiered at the 2010 World Science Festival in New York City. Executive Producers: Tracy Day, World Science Festival, New York and Gillian Moore, Southbank Centre, London, in collaboration with the Royal Society. Presented by Aspen Music Festival and School.
Brian Greene
Benedict Music Tent
Tutorial Session   Space and the Cosmos
We Are the 5 Percent: Identifying the Dark 95 Percent of the Universe
10:20 am - 11:20 am MDT on Friday, June 28, 2013
Dark matter is exotic stuff that rarely interacts with anything else, yet it dictates the shapes of galaxies and the overall structure of the universe. Dark energy is a bizarre force or property of space itself that compels the universe to expand more quickly as it ages. Together, these hidden ingredients make up 95 percent of the universe. Within the next decade, solvable clues may come from the world's biggest physics collider, sensitive underground detectors, satellites that spy the eerie gravitational warpings, and telescopes carried by high-altitude balloons over Canada. This age of discovery has energized physicists and astronomers alike as they try to understand the true nature of our cosmos.
Richard Massey Dan Hooper Robert Irion
Doerr-Hosier Center, Kaufman Room
Lunch Session off Campus   Space and the Cosmos
BBC World Service’s “The Forum”: Peering into the Smallest Corners of Space
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm MDT on Friday, June 28, 2013
(Tickets Required) This special taping of BBC World Service’s “The Forum” is a fascinating discussion on why looking for some of the smaller elements of space might have big implications for all of us. Former NASA astronaut Ed Lu believes we have to find all the asteroids in the solar system, even the little ones, before they find us. Harvard’s professor of physics Lisa Randall shares her latest research on dark matter, and Fermilab astrophysicist Craig Hogan is trying to find out if space is infinitely divisible or if there is a smallest, fundamental unit.
Ed Lu Lisa Randall Craig Hogan Bridget Kendall
Hotel Jerome Ballroom
Tutorial Session   Space and the Cosmos
Limits of Reality: Time and Space on the Largest and Smallest Scales
1:20 pm - 2:20 pm MDT on Friday, June 28, 2013
We all learn about space and time as children, yet they are still profound mysteries at the cutting edge of physics research. This session surveys several current experiments that probe exotic behavior of space and time: a "Dark Energy Camera" to study the accelerating expansion of cosmic space; laser interferometers that listen for gravitational waves from black holes; and the Fermilab Holometer, an experiment to search for universal "holographic noise" from the quantum nature of space-time — the bandwidth limit of reality.
Craig Hogan
Koch Building, Booz Allen Hamilton Room
Plenary Session   Space and the Cosmos
Deadly Asteroids: Can We Spot Them in Time?
2:40 pm - 3:40 pm MDT on Friday, June 28, 2013
The relatively small asteroid that exploded in the skies over Siberia last February, injuring over 1,000 people, was a shocking reminder that our planet is a target in a cosmic shooting range. Larger asteroids, from the width of a football field to the size of a small city, have the potential to be killers on a massive scale: in previous collisions with Earth, they have set off deadly blast waves, raging fires, and colossal tidal waves. Fortunately, space rocks like these can be deflected––if we have enough warning. But whose responsibility is it to survey for, and protect against, these potential doomsday bringers? Leaders of governmental and private organizations discuss the defense against the next strike.
Lindley Johnson Ed Lu Paula Apsell
Doerr-Hosier Center, McNulty Room
Speaker Salon   Space and the Cosmos
Human Spaceflight: A Life-Changing Experience
5:30 pm - 6:30 pm MDT on Friday, June 28, 2013
(Tickets Required) Veteran Space Shuttle Commander Jeff Ashby relates his personal observations of daily life and human behavior in the environment of the International Space Station. Rather than giving a technical talk, Captain Ashby talks about the human space experience, including observations on how humans adapt to weightlessness, what it feels like to travel to the Space Station, and how a view of the Earth from 240 miles altitude can be life changing. He will also share his perspectives on private space tourism and describe what it would be like to take a $200,000 ride into space aboard a suborbital launch vehicle.
Jeffrey Ashby
Limelight Hotel
Evening Session   Space and the Cosmos
The World’s Most Awesome Stargazing Event at 11,212 Feet
7:00 pm - 10:00 pm MDT on Friday, June 28, 2013
(Tickets Required) Pack your binoculars, a picnic blanket, and your curiosity and board the Silver Queen Gondola for a ride to the top of Aspen Mountain. Astronomy experts will guide this stargazing party and share their scientific research on topics ranging from black holes to dark energy to the origins of the universe. Your stargazing experience will take on new dimensions when these captivating storytellers share tales about space mythology, what the stars mean in different cultures, and more. Telescope experts will guide you as you peer through outdoor telescopes aimed at the night sky, bringing you closer than ever to the Milky Way, shooting stars, and sparkling constellations. Adults and kids of all ages will enjoy “Martian ice cream” made on site with a high-tech, liquid nitrogen process. (This event is produced In partnership with the Aspen Science Center.)
Charles Alcock Maria Banks Craig Hogan Dan Hooper Justin Kasper Richard Massey Dimitar Sasselov Ka Chun Yu
Sundeck, Aspen Mountain
Breakfast Talk   Space and the Cosmos
Dare to Dream Big! Insights from the First Iranian Woman in Space
7:45 am - 8:45 am MDT on Saturday, June 29, 2013
(Tickets Required) Fleeing her homeland of Iran after the Islamic Revolution, Anousheh Ansari settled in Texas and built a highly successful technology firm whose net worth ultimately allowed her to achieve her childhood dream of spaceflight. Through her sponsorship of the X Prize, she fueled the movement of privatization of space exploration. In her role as the first-ever female commercial spaceflight participant, Ansari’s story speaks to the power of commitment and conviction, realizing dreams, and making the impossible possible. After her return to Earth, Ansari launched herself into the management of her new tech company as well as her family foundation, which supports social entrepreneurship and STEM education and is committed to ensuring a better future for the world through investment and empowerment of youth.
Anousheh Ansari Richard Hollingham
Limelight Hotel
Tutorial Session   Space and the Cosmos
Far Out, Up Close: Visualizing the Invisible
10:20 am - 11:20 am MDT on Saturday, June 29, 2013
Telescopes, satellites, probes, and rovers have transformed how we perceive the universe and helped make the invisible, visible. New technologies now enable us to visualize the cosmos in even greater detail, understand our home planet in new ways, immerse ourselves in alien environments, and even see through the eyes of robot explorers. Expert speakers discuss how to bring the far out of our universe, up close.
Charles Alcock David McConville Richard Hollingham
Paepcke Auditorium
Planetarium Show   Space and the Cosmos
Journey to the Stars
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm MDT on Saturday, June 29, 2013
(PLANETARIUM SHOW) Featuring extraordinary images from telescopes on the ground and in space and stunning, never-before-seen visualizations of physics-based simulations, the dazzling Journey to the Stars launches visitors through space and time to experience the life and death of the stars in our night sky, including our own nurturing Sun. Tour familiar stellar formations, explore new celestial mysteries, and discover the fascinating, unfolding story that connects us all to the stars. Those who come along for the journey may never see the night sky in the same way again. Produced by the American Museum of Natural History
Buckminster Fuller Dome, Planetarium
Lunch Session on Campus   Space and the Cosmos
Extraterrestrial Life: Are We Alone?
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm MDT on Saturday, June 29, 2013
It’s a question that we have pondered for years: is life on earth really the only life that’s out there in the universe? Turns out there’s a good chance it’s not just us. With research indicating that other planets might be able to host life, how should we be thinking about interactions between extraterrestrial and Earth life? Planetary protection involves avoiding contamination of other locations in the universe with Earth life, as well as preventing unpleasant things happening when possibly-inhabited material is brought to Earth from other planets. How can we tell the difference between extraterrestrial and Earth life? What do we need to keep Earth safe, and other planets safe from contamination by us?
Dimitar Sasselov Catharine Conley Tracy Day
Koch Building, Booz Allen Hamilton Room
Planetarium Show   Space and the Cosmos
Fire and Lights: Mankind Illuminating the Cosmos
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm MDT on Saturday, June 29, 2013
(PLANETARIUM SHOW-Tickets Required) We are accustomed to seeing our earth in space as a beautiful blue marble highlighted by the azure seas and the scattered light of our atmosphere. Astonishing patterns appear when we gaze at the dark side of our planet. Come see these new data sets showing the earth at night, and glean insights into our patterns of combustion and illumination. Read the patterns of lifestyle and resource distribution shown by the shimmering lights of our civilization. What are the implications of the unequal distribution of light?
Bob Raynolds
Buckminster Fuller Dome, Planetarium
Planetarium Show   Space and the Cosmos
Life: A Cosmic Story
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm MDT on Sunday, June 30, 2013
(PLANETARIUM SHOW) How did life on Earth begin? This tantalizing question forms the basis of a high-speed ride through the history of life. Narrated by Jodie Foster, with an exceptional soundtrack. Come explore the age-old mystery: How did life on Earth begin? Produced by the California Academy of Sciences
Buckminster Fuller Dome, Planetarium
Lunch Session on Campus   Space and the Cosmos
Music, Contemplation, and the Cosmos
12:30 pm - 1:15 pm MDT on Sunday, June 30, 2013
Enjoy a visually and acoustically stimulating celebration of science and music, as you listen to music from a string quartet and observe the celestial spheres of our universe.
Ned Gardiner Ka Chun Yu David McConville Bob Raynolds
Buckminster Fuller Dome, Planetarium
Planetarium Show   Space and the Cosmos
Perceiving Home: New Perspectives on Our Changing Planet
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm MDT on Sunday, June 30, 2013
(PLANETARIUM SHOW-Tickets Required) Homo sapiens sapiens. Does our species' name itself suggest hubris? We hope not, for in Greco-Roman traditions, pride is considered the most serious of the seven deadly sins. Viewing Earth from space, we can see evidence for an excessive love of ourselves in that we convert nature's wealth for short-term, selfish needs. But there is indeed another perspective—that humans have put considerable effort into the acts of seeing and knowing. Our eyes in the sky give us a view of the invisible and an ability to resolve changes over large distances and long periods of time. Satellite images reveal the connections between living and physical systems on a planetary scale. Herein is the great challenge and opportunity of our age: to see where we've been and where we are going. Experience for yourself how today's generations of humans are setting the stage for a great future by measuring and understanding planetary processes.
Ned Gardiner
Buckminster Fuller Dome, Planetarium
Planetarium Show   Space and the Cosmos
Cosmic Collisions
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm MDT on Monday, July 1, 2013
(PLANETARIUM SHOW) From subatomic particles to the largest galaxies, cosmic collisions are a universal force of nature. Creative and destructive, dynamic and dazzling, collisions have resulted in many things we take for granted – the glowing Moon, the Sun’s warmth and light, our changing seasons, waves crashing up on a sandy shore. They’ve ended the age of dinosaurs and changed the very map of the cosmos, reforming galaxies and giving birth to new stars and new worlds. Cosmic Collisions provides an unprecedented and extraordinary view of these catastrophic and constructive events that have shaped our world and our universe. Produced by the American Museum of Natural History
Buckminster Fuller Dome, Planetarium
Planetarium Show   Space and the Cosmos
Visualizing Worldviews: between Cognition and Cosmos
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm MDT on Monday, July 1, 2013
(PLANETARIUM SHOW-Tickets Required) Carl Sagan famously observed that each of us are "starstuff pondering the stars,” while Alan Watts suggested we are "aperture[s] through which the universe is looking at itself and exploring itself.” Come explore the implications of these profound insights by taking an interactive journey through NASA's Digital Universe Atlas, the most complete 3D model of the observable cosmos. See how centuries of scientific efforts to map and measure the world around us are once again revealing perennial paradoxes of perception, blurring the boundaries between cognition and cosmos.
David McConville
Buckminster Fuller Dome, Planetarium
Planetarium Show   Space and the Cosmos
The Great Transition Begins
10:20 am - 11:20 am MDT on Tuesday, July 2, 2013
(PLANETARIUM SHOW) Western North America is changing. The forested ecosystem of the mountain West is being consumed by a voracious insect. This is not just nature "red in tooth and claw" as we knew it last century. The denuding of the West is the culmination of a changing climate combined with ecosystems out of balance. Come be a part of the transformation back toward a resilient landscape and economy as we explore natural principles to find a new equilibrium among people, beetles, fire, and trees.
Bob Raynolds
Buckminster Fuller Dome, Planetarium
Planetarium Show   Space and the Cosmos
Dancing with the Stars
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm MDT on Tuesday, July 2, 2013
(PLANETARIUM SHOW) Come dance beneath the cosmos. Internationally renowned tango instructor Heather Morrow will teach the relationship between human bodies and the music of celestial spheres.
Buckminster Fuller Dome, Planetarium